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enchantedsleeper:

Lady in Yellow (1899), Max Kurzweil

enchantedsleeper:

Lady in Yellow (1899), Max Kurzweil

(via idealisticthings)

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hyggehaven:

ecmajor:

architectureofdoom:

A climbing plant peels off a brick building, in an effect reminiscent of a snake shedding a layer of skin

holy shit, i have never seen this happen before. Whoah

This is crazy, and also sad.

hyggehaven:

ecmajor:

architectureofdoom:

A climbing plant peels off a brick building, in an effect reminiscent of a snake shedding a layer of skin

holy shit, i have never seen this happen before. Whoah

This is crazy, and also sad.

(Source: malformalady, via les-looups)

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beatonna:

is good bear

beatonna:

is good bear

(Source: groeneinkt)

Photo
orlansky:

Some smart people once said to never aim your camera at the sun. I never listen to smart people.

orlansky:

Some smart people once said to never aim your camera at the sun. I never listen to smart people.

Tags: nyc
Photoset

The Grand Budapest Hotel (2013, dir. Wes Anderson)

(Source: ewanmcgregored, via lawyerupasshole)

Photoset

(Source: lawyerupasshole)

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Photo
nprbooks:


Men stood by their fences and looked at the ruined corn, drying fast now, only a little green showing through the film of dust. The men were silent and they did not move often. And the women came out of the houses to stand beside their men — to feel whether this time the men would break. The women studied the men’s faces secretly, for the corn could go, as long as something else remained.

John Steinbeck’s Dust Bowl masterpiece The Grapes of Wrath turns 75 today, and our own Lynn Neary has an appreciation of the book here.
If you’ve been following along with us as we read the book, our final meeting is this afternoon at 3pm EDT over on Monkey See with Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.  Please join us!

nprbooks:

Men stood by their fences and looked at the ruined corn, drying fast now, only a little green showing through the film of dust. The men were silent and they did not move often. And the women came out of the houses to stand beside their men — to feel whether this time the men would break. The women studied the men’s faces secretly, for the corn could go, as long as something else remained.

John Steinbeck’s Dust Bowl masterpiece The Grapes of Wrath turns 75 today, and our own Lynn Neary has an appreciation of the book here.

If you’ve been following along with us as we read the book, our final meeting is this afternoon at 3pm EDT over on Monkey See with Steinbeck scholar Susan Shillinglaw.  Please join us!

Photo
Photo
npr:

ilovecharts:

History’s Great Floss-ophers 

(Submitted via)

npr:

ilovecharts:

History’s Great Floss-ophers 

(Submitted via)

(via nprbooks)